Love the most misunderstood word in the English language

Love the most misunderstood word in the English language

7 Types of Love, according to the ancient Greeks-

Eros: Love of the body. Eros was the Greek God of love and sexual desire. …
Philia: Love of the mind or deep friendship. …
Ludus: Playful love. …
Pragma: Longstanding love. …
Agape: Love of the soul. …
Philautia: Love of the self. …
Storge: Love of the child.

-7 Types of Love, according to the ancient Greeks

What is the highest form of love?
Agape (Ancient Greek ἀγάπη, agapē) is a Greco-Christian term referring to love, “the highest form of love, charity” and “the love of God for man and of man for God”.

Sophia: The Ancient Greek word Sophia (σοφία, sophía) is the abstract noun of σοφός (sophós), which variously translates to “clever, skillful, intelligent, wise”. These words share the same Proto-Indo-European root as the Latin verb sapere (lit. “to taste; discern”), whence sapientia.

Philosophy Definition-

From the Greek ‘philo’, Love, and ‘Sophia’, wisdom, Philosophy is, literally defined, “the love of wisdom”. More broadly understood, it is the study of the most basic and the most profound matters of human existence. Philosophy, in the West, began in the Greek colony of Miletus with Thales (who, according to ancient sources, was the first to ask “What is the basic stuff of the universe from which all else comes?”) but spread outward in the works of subsequent thinkers and writers to reach its heights in the works of Plato and his pupil Aristotle. The mathematician and mystic Pythagoras (famed for his Pythagorean Theorem today) was the first to call himself a philosopher.

-Philosophy Definition

Do you see how defining Philosophy as “the love of wisdom”; is a much too narrow definition?

To me the definition of Philosophy is loving the mind so that you can have a deep friendship with cleverness, skillfulness, intelligence, and wisdom.

Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. “Where Do We Go From Here?: Chaos or Community”-

“Power, properly understood, is the ability to achieve purpose. It is the strength required to bring about social, political or economic changes. In this sense power is not only desirable but necessary in order to implement the demands of love and justice. One of the greatest problems of history is that the concept of love and power are usually contrasted as polar opposites. Love is identified with a resignation of power and power with a denial of love . It was this misinterpretation that caused Nietzsche, the philosopher of the “will to power,” to reject the Christian concept of love. It was this same misinterpretation which induced Christian theologians to reject Nietzsche’s philosophy of the “will to power” in the name of the Christian idea of love. What is needed is a realization that power without love is reckless and abusive and that love without power is sentimental and anemic. Power at its best is love implementing the demands of justice. Justice at its best is love correcting everything that stands against love.”

-Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. “Where Do We Go From Here?: Chaos or Community”

Stephen R. Covey, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change

“My wife and I just don’t have the same feelings for each other we used to have. I guess I just don’t love her anymore and she doesn’t love me. What can I do?”

“The feeling isn’t there anymore?” I asked.

“That’s right,” he reaffirmed. “And we have three children we’re really concerned about. What do you suggest?”

“Love her,” I replied.

“I told you, the feeling just isn’t there anymore.”

“Love her.”

“You don’t understand. the feeling of love just isn’t there.”

“Then love her. If the feeling isn’t there, that’s a good reason to love her.”

“But how do you love when you don’t love?”

“My friend , love is a verb. Love – the feeling – is a fruit of love, the verb. So love her. Serve her. Sacrifice. Listen to her. Empathize. Appreciate. Affirm her. Are you willing to do that?”

― Stephen R. Covey, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change

So love requires me to serve, sacrifice, listen, empathize, appreciate, affirm, etc….

“Behold, my brothers, the spring has come; the earth has received the embraces of the sun and we shall soon see the results of that love! Every seed has awakened and so has all animal life. It is through this mysterious power that we too have our being and we therefore yield to our neighbors, even our animal neighbors, the same right as ourselves, to inhabit this land. Yet hear me, my people, we have now to deal with another race – small and feeble when our fathers first met them, but now great and overbearing. Strangely enough they have a mind to till the soil and the love of possessions is a disease with them . . . They claim this mother of ours, the earth, for their own, and fence their neighbors away; they deface her with their buildings and their refuse. They threaten to take [the land] away from us. My brothers, shall we submit, or shall we say to them: “First kill me before you take possession of my Fatherland.” – Sitting Bull’s Speech at the Powder River Council, 1877.

Matthew 5:45 That ye may be the children of your Father which is in heaven: for he maketh his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust.

So love seeks to serve, sacrifice, listen, empathize, appreciate, affirm, etc….”the earth has received the embraces of the sun and we shall soon see the results of that love!”…”he maketh his sun to rise on the evil and on the good”

Reflect on this:

What is needed is a realization that power without love is reckless and abusive and that love without power is sentimental and anemic. Power at its best is love implementing the demands of justice. Justice at its best is love correcting everything that stands against love. – Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.