Our Two Party Political System is the problem

Our Two Party Political System is the problem

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What form of business organization do the Republican and Democratic national parties take? LLC, Corporation?

 

  1. Kevin Robinson, PoliSci B.A.. Have worked as a campaign volunteer

Answered 24 Sep 2015

The national political parties are non-profit corporations, exempt from taxes under the IRS code as 527 organizations.  527s can also be independent political action committees, but the Republican National Committee and the Democratic National Committee have been sheltered under those rules for a long time.

Remember, the national parties in the US are actually umbrella groups, with member parties from the 50 states, DC and the territories.  How any local party may be structured can be different, based on state laws.

There are also often separately registered structures, such as the national campaign committees to elect party members to the Senate and to the House of Representatives.

 

  1. Stephen Lange, Rockefeller=> A. Rand=>Buckley=>Reagan=>?

Answered 24 Sep 2015

All political organizations are 527 organizations

a type of U.S. tax-exempt organization organized under Section 527 of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. § 527).

The details can be found at Tax Information for Political Organizations

https://www.irs.gov/charities-non-profits/political-organizations

(Take notice charities-non-profits [IRS put it in that category], COMMENTS MINE! Political parties are not government agencies, but non-profit corporations [associations, committees, or organizations] set up to advertise someone, who meets their criteria, for political office.)

Federal Election Commission United States -of – America

  • 100.13 National committee (52 U.S.C. 30101(14)).

National committee means the organization which, by virtue of the bylaws of a political party, is responsible for the day-to-day operation of the political party at the national level, as determined by the Commission.

  • 100.14 State Committee, subordinate committee, district, or local committee (52 U.S.C. 30101(15)).
  1. State committee means the organization that by virtue of the bylaws of a political party or the operation of State law is part of the official party structure and is responsible for the day-to-day operation of the political party at the State level, including an entity that is directly or indirectly established, financed, maintained, or controlled by that organization, as determined by the Commission.
  2. District or local committee means any organization that by virtue of the bylaws of a political party or the operation of State law is part of the official party structure, and is responsible for the day-to-day operation of the political party at the level of city, county, neighborhood, ward, district, precinct, or any other subdivision of a State.
  3. Subordinate committee of a State, district, or local committee means any organization that at the level of city, county, neighborhood, ward, district, precinct, or any other subdivision of a State or any organization under the control or direction of the State committee, and is directly or indirectly established, financed, maintained, or controlled by the State, district, or local committee.
  • 100.15 Political party (52 U.S.C. 30101(16)).

Political party means an association, committee, or organization which nominates or selects a candidate for election to any Federal office, whose name appears on an election ballot as the candidate of the association, committee, or organization.

 

Why Are There Political Parties?

To discover the origins of political parties in the United States, we have to go back a couple of centuries to the birth of our nation. As our Constitution was drafted and eventually ratified, two groups with different interests emerged.

Alexander Hamilton led a group of leaders who wanted a strong central government that would protect the country’s growing businesses. They became known as the Federalists and are considered the first political party in the United States.

In response to the Federalists, Thomas Jefferson led a group of leaders who wanted to limit the power of the federal government, leaving most of the power in the hands of state and local governments. These anti-Federalists became known as Democratic-Republicans.

Over the next century, political parties would come and go. Around the time of the Civil War, there were four major political parties. Our modern system with two major political parties — the Democrats and Republicans — has evolved and solidified over the last century.

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So a strong central government or limit the power of the federal government; but where do individual issues fall in this argument? Basically they are chaff in the wind (and I do mean wind; there is a lot of bluster in both parties) of the basic argument.

First I wish to declare myself an unaffiliated (independent) voter.

In a January 2016 article on The Hill, Michael Coblenz wrote “The two-party system is destroying America. Democrats and Republicans are in a death match and the American people are caught in the middle.”

In an article for The Wall Street Journal, Matthew J. Dowd writes “The evolution of the 2016 election has shown that the two major parties are going to have to deal with the disruption independents are forcing on the system. This cycle is likely to be an accelerator for the success of independents locally and at the state level – developments that can only be good for our democracy.”

In my view the US is theoretically a multi-party system, the country has been operating as a two-party system since the Civil War. Is the polarizing extremism of this kind of system truly tearing America apart?

http://www.wholenessofliving.com/philosophy-spirituality/fundamentalism/

It is party and ideology over all else.

Another thing is the winner takes all mentality.

Our founding fathers set up a philosophy that generally says the more far reaching the decision is; the larger the majority required in making the decision. With two party systems the temptation of making the decision with the smallest majority as possible, offering the greatest advantage to the party, is too great.

We have states where someone can get 51% of the vote and take all the electoral votes; this is not representative government. This is government by lottery.

The Nuclear Option is a parliamentary procedure that allows the United States Senate to override a rule or precedent by a simple majority of 51 votes, instead of by a supermajority of 60 votes.

Supposedly only Congress can declare War, so we rename it a “police action” or something else. It still stinks like “War”. The implements and people of War are moved around without deliberation. Congress just sits there and lets it happen; so one person makes the decision. How representative of We The People is that?

As an unaffiliated (independent) voter I am stuck in the area between the extreme movements of a pendulum from one party to another. Another analogy is a tennis match where one point gained is another’s lost. Governing this country is not a zero sum game. One group should not be advantaged more than another. “Uniform” is a word used in the constitution; basically it means equal and fair treatment across the board. For rich or poor young or old; whatever range you choose to delineate bounds.

The reason we have two political parties is that the “Two” have driven out of the market place all the others and make the rules to their advantage.

My opinion is that we can no longer afford to have a majority party of “One” run our country.