USA the Promised Land for White Evangelical Christians

https://www.au.org/resources/publications/is-america-a-christian-nation

Americans United for Separation of Church and State

Excerpts-

WHAT WE BELIEVE

The wall of separation between church and state protects us all. It makes our country more fair, more equal and more inclusive.
We envision a nation where everyone can freely choose a faith and support it voluntarily, or follow no religious or spiritual path at all, and where the government does not promote religion over non-religion or favor one faith over another.

OUR MISSION

Americans United for Separation of Church and State is a nonpartisan educational and advocacy organization dedicated to advancing the separation of religion and government as the only way to ensure freedom of religion, including the right to believe or not believe, for all.

The U.S. Constitution is a wholly secular document. It contains no mention of Christianity or Jesus Christ. In fact, the Constitution refers to religion only twice in the First Amendment, which bars laws “respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof,” and in Article VI, which prohibits “religious tests” for public office. Both of these provisions are evidence that the country was not founded as officially Christian.

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; — First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

While some of the country’s founders believed that the government should espouse Christianity, that viewpoint soon became a losing proposition. In Virginia, Patrick Henry argued in favor of tax support for Christian churches. But Henry and his cohorts were in the minority and lost that battle. Jefferson, James Madison and their allies among the state’s religious groups ended Virginia’s established church and helped pass the Virginia Statute for Religious Liberty, a 1786 law guaranteeing religious freedom to all.

We the General Assembly of Virginia do enact that no man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship, place, or ministry whatsoever, nor shall be enforced, restrained, molested, or burthened in his body or goods, nor shall otherwise suffer, on account of his religious opinions or belief; but that all men shall be free to profess, and by argument to maintain, their opinions in matters of religion, and that the same shall in no wise diminish, enlarge, or affect their civil capacities. — Virginia Statute for Religious Liberty

Maryland representative Luther Martin said that a handful of delegates to the Constitutional Convention argued for formal recognition of Christianity in the Constitution, insisting that such language was necessary in order to “hold out some distinction between the professors of Christianity and downright infidelity or paganism.” But that view was not adopted, and the Constitution gave government no authority over religion. Article VI, which allows persons of all religious viewpoints to hold public office, was adopted by a unanimous vote. Through ratification of the First Amendment, observed Jefferson, the American people built a “wall of separation between church and state.”

Early national leaders understood that separation of church and state would be good for all faiths including Christianity. Jefferson rejoiced that Virginia had passed his religious freedom law, noting that it would ensure religious freedom for “the Jew and the Gentile, the Christian and Mahometan, the Hindoo, the infidel of every denomination.”

Other early U.S. leaders echoed that view. President George Washington, in a famous 1790 letter to a Jewish congregation in Newport, R.I., celebrated the fact that Jews had full freedom of worship in America. Noted Washington, “All possess alike liberty of conscience and immunities of citizenship.”

Washington’s administration even negotiated a treaty with the Muslim rulers of north Africa that stated explicitly that the United States was not founded on Christianity. The pact, known as the Treaty with Tripoli, was approved unanimously by the Senate in 1797, under the administration of John Adams. Article 11 of the treaty states, “[T]he government of the United States is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion….”

The government of the United States is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion… — U.S. Treaty with Tripoli, 1797

A more accurate judicial view of the relationship between religion and government is described by Justice John Paul Stevens in his 1985 Wallace v. Jaffree ruling. Commenting on the constitutional right of all Americans to choose their own religious belief, Stevens wrote, “At one time it was thought that this right merely proscribed the preference of one Christian sect over another, but would not require equal respect for the conscience of the infidel, the atheist, or the adherent of a non-Christian faith such as Mohammedism or Judaism. But when the underlying principle has been examined in the crucible of litigation, the Court has unambiguously concluded that the individual freedom of conscience protected by the First Amendment embraces the right to select any religious faith or none at all.”
When the underlying principle has been examined in the crucible of litigation, the Court has unambiguously concluded that the individual freedom of conscience protected by the First Amendment embraces the right to select any religious faith or none at all. —Justice John Paul Stevens

A determined faction of Christians has fought against this wise and time-tested policy throughout our history. In the mid 19th century, several efforts were made to add specific references to Christianity to the Constitution. One group, the National Reform Association (NRA), pushed a “Christian nation” amendment in Congress in 1864. NRA members believed that the Civil War was divine punishment for failing to mention God in the Constitution and saw the amendment as a way to atone for that omission.

The NRA amendment called for “humbly acknowledging Almighty God as the source of all authority and power in civil government, the Lord Jesus Christ as the Ruler among the nations, [and] His revealed will as the supreme law of the land, in order to constitute a Christian government.” Ten years later, the House Judiciary Committee voted against its adoption. The committee noted “the dangers which the union between church and state had imposed upon so many nations of the Old World” and said in light of that it was felt “inexpedient to put anything into the Constitution which might be construed to be a reference to any religious creed or doctrine.”

Similar theocratic proposals resurfaced in Congress sporadically over the years. As late as 1950, a proposal was introduced in the Senate that would have added language to the Constitution that “devoutly recognizes the Authority and Law of Jesus Christ, Saviour and Ruler of nations, through whom are bestowed the blessings of liberty.” This amendment was never voted out of committee. Efforts to revive it in the early 1960s were unsuccessful.

-Excerpts

Do you think that George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, or John Adams were confused about the kind of nation they founded?

Who then wants to make the USA a Christian Nation?

Study this for yourself and come up with your own answers.

Look at other countries which have declared a state religion or a state of no religion. How has this worked out for them and their standing in the world?

Here is the lyrics to a song that has always bothered me (that God favors one group of people over another):

THIS LAND IS MINE aka THE EXODUS SONG
From the Film “Exodus” (1960/1961)
(Ernest Gold / Pat Boone)

Pat Boone – 1961
Ferrante & Teicher – 1961
Eddie Harris – 1961
Mantovani – 1961
Edith Piaf – 1961

Also recorded by :
Manny Albam; Aristakis; Chet Atkins; Bad Manners; Ray Barretto;
Count Basie; BBC Concert Orch.; Biddu Orch.; Boston Pops Orch.;
Ray Bryant; Gaylord Carter; Richard Clayderman; Luis Cobos;
The Duprees; The el Caminos; Percy Faith; Fantastic Strings;
Ernest Gold; Davy Graham; Grant Green; Slide Hampton;
Eddie Harris; Neal Hefti; Quincy Jones; The Lively Ones;
Maksim; Jiri Malasek; Junior Mance; Henry Mancini; Shelly Manne;
Mireille Mathieu; Tommy McCook; ….. and many others.

This land is mine, God gave this land to me
This brave and ancient land to me
And when the morning sun reveals her hills and plain
Then I see a land where children can run free

So take my hand and walk this land with me
And walk this lovely land with me
Though I am just a man, when you are by my side
With the help of God, I know I can be strong

Though I am just a man, when you are by my side
With the help of God, I know I can be strong

To make this land our home
If I must fight, I’ll fight to make this land our own
Until I die, this land is mine

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/god-gave-this-land-to-the_b_6250182

Marty Kaplan – This is a crosspost of my column in the Jewish Journal, where you can reach me at martyk@jewishjournal.com.